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Writing an RFP for A Trade Show Booth? Here’s What It Should Have

Looking forward to getting a trade show booth designed? There are two ways to go about it: you can either provide the designer or the exhibition stand builder with half-baked information and wait for them to mess up, leaving you with no choice but to go back to square one, or you could furnish enough information at once, maximizing the chances of getting the perfect design delivered the very first time. Which one would you choose?

RFP Essentials for a Trade Show Booth Design

 

Company Profile

You could start with a general overview of your company, but do disclose your achievements and more importantly, how you fit into the industry landscape. If you have an edge over the competition, now is the time to put it on paper. Here is what else could be a part of the profile you share with the trade show booth designer:

– Your style guide, if any, the one that you follow for getting your logo, tagline etc. printed on your marketing collaterals

– Your annual report, but only if you are comfortable sharing it and believe that it could lead to a much better design

            – Get them to sign a non-disclosure agreement if the need be

– Do explain your products and services; a detailed description of your company’s offerings and the demographics you cater to would help the designer in visualizing what may or may not work for you.

 

New or Upcoming Products

Have you recently launched a new product, or want to launch one at the show you are about to participate in? Either way, do let the builder know. If some products are still in the pipeline but likely to be introduced later in the year, you could use the show as the perfect platform for making an announcement. Then again, make sure that the designer is in the loop.

Objectives of Participation

You know that you are participating in a show to generate more leads or to find a possible solution to the challenge of reaching out to a wider audience, but the question is: does your exhibition booth designer know? Tell them what you are after, i.e. what is it that you expect out of the show and of course the design. You may also want to make a mention of how you plan to achieve your objectives. Would you be hosting a live speaker? Would you be conducting product demonstrations to keep the attendees engaged? Anything and everything that could have a bearing on your trade show booth design should be communicated.

Budgetary Constraints

You may have set aside some money for trade shows and exhibitions, but only you know how much of it can be spent on your booth, given that exhibition marketing warrants additional expenses as well. Set the record straight. Let them know what kind of a budget they’ll be looking at. This would help in setting realistic expectations.

In addition, you may also want to talk about the past, present & future trade shows, and yes, do include a stipulated deadline so that they don’t take ages to get back to you. The idea is to strike a balance and follow the “not too much, never too little” approach.

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